Pécs | Hungary | University | Week 22

Pécs [german: Fünfkirchen; latin: Quinque Ecclesiae; serbian: Pečuj], known in the 3rd century Roman Empire as Sopianae, then first mentioned as Quinque Basilicae (english: five cathedrals) in 871, lies in a triangle south of Budapest, east of Zagreb and northwest of Belgrade about 150-200 km away from each of these capitals. 5th largest city in Hungary.

Population: 146.000 [2015] | 170.000 [1990] | 74.000 [1930] | 54.000 [1900]

Pécs is one of the oldest cities in Hungary and known for its multicultural flair and history. It is the capital of the Baranya County and the seat of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Pecs. The Early Christian Necropolis of Pecs (Sopianae) has been declared a UNESCO world heritage site in 2000. The city had been a part of Hungary since the late 9th century. It fell under Ottoman Rule in 1543 and was freed again 1686 to become part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. After World War I it became part of the new state Hungary in 1921. Pécs has been a European Capital of Culture in 2010.

The University of Pécs (Pécsi Tudományegyetem) has first been founded in 1367 by Louis I. the Great and was the first university in Hungary. It was however discontinued under Ottoman Rule. The modern university of Pecs was founded in 1912 in Pozsony (now Bratislava) and moved to Pecs in 1921. Above we see the front facade of its main building, housing the Faculty of Business and Economics (KTK).

Click for larger view:

Pécsi Tudományegyetem University Hungary

For classic view and more infos about the streetview (german link):

Pécsi Tudományegyetem Panorama Foto

Another street view we documented is from Széchenyi Square with the Nádor Szálló and Pécs Town Hall (Városháza), previewed here:

Széchenyi Square Streetview Panorama Pecs Hungary

These panoramas of Pécs were created based on photographies taken by the hungarian photographer Kerényi Zoltán.

 

Greiz | Germany | Train Station | Week 21

Greiz, first mentioned as Grewcs in 1209, lies 80 km south of Leipzig, 120 km west of Dresden and ca. 250 km east of Frankfurt on the river Weisse Elster. 18th largest city of the german state Thuringia (german: Thüringen).

Population: 21.000 [2014] | 36.000 [1984] | 39.000 [1931] | 23.000 [1905]

Greiz, also nicknamed the „Pearl of the Vogtland“ is situated in the thuringian Vogtland, named after the Vögte (advocats) of Weida, Gera, Plauen and Greiz. First a residence in the mid 13th century it has been home to the „House of Reuss“, a ruling german dynasty, from the 14th century to 1918. They have built the two castles in the city, the Oberes Schloss (Upper Castle) and Unteres Schloss (Lower Castle). As a former residence city Greiz is known for its representative buildings, some of them in Art Nouveau style, and the english style Greizer Park with its Sommerpalais (summer palace).

Here we see the main train station building of Greiz with its annexe buildings. The station building was errected in the 1870s when the connection to Plauen was established. At the time of this photograph in 2014 it was uninhabited and as a sign on its door declares „for sale“ – though trains are still stopping at the station. However we chose this street view as an example of train stations in linear panorama views. The historic station buildings all over europe often occupied a complete street front hard to be photographed in its entirety. You can find more examples in our train station archive.

Click for larger view:

Bahnhof Greiz Thueringen Panorama

For classic view and more infos about the streetview (german link):

train station germany greiz

Previously published streetlines from Thuringia and Greiz

Yet unpublished here is a linear view of the central ensemble with the Lower Castle, the Gymnasium and the Upper Castle in the back:

Greiz Panorama Unteres Oberes Schloss

We documented a number of train station buildings across europe (inlcuding Istanbul, Prague, Paris, Milan, Glasgow…) which are yet unedited, here are some unfinnished examples:

Görlitz Bahnhof train station

Quedlinburg train station germany

Bahnhof Rheinland Pfalz Worms

Öuxor train station test photography

Prague train station

top to bottom: Görlitz, Quedlinburg, Worms, Luxor, Prague

 

Edinburgh | United Kingdom | Victoria Street | Week 20

Edinburgh [scottish gaelic: Dùn Èideann; french: Édimbourg], the hill forth Din Eidyn by the Gododdin tribe was built sometime before 600 AD and the city was founded as a royal burgh in the early 12th century. Situated about 70 km east of Glasgow and ca. 550 km north of London on the southern shore of the Firth of Forth. 2nd largest city in Scotland, 8th largest city in the United Kingdom and 61st largest city in the european union.

Population: 493.000 [2014] | 419.000 [1991] | 439.000 [1991] | 395.000 [1901]

Edinburgh, lying east of Glasgow in the scottish central belt, has been the capital of Scotland since the mid 15th century, hence it is the seat of the Scottish Parliament and of the monarchy in Scotland. The city is a UNESCO world heritage site since 1995, notably for its Old Town with Edinburgh Castle, the Holyrood Palace and the Royal Mile connecting the two, as well as the planned 18th century Georgian New Town. The city is also home to the National Museum and the National Library of Scotland as well as the Scottish National Gallery. Today the city is known for its strong economic, especially in the financial sector and the tourism industry, as well as its cultural festivals, especially the Edinburgh International Festival and the Fringe Festival.

Victoria Street is the historical, being called West Bow then, entrance to the Castle Hill from western direction. It was transformed to its current shape in the early 19th century and renamed Victoria Street when Queen Victoria was crowned. Most buildings were errected in the mid 19th century, though some older buildings remained at the foot of the street. Here we see the grand India Buildings from 1864 on the left and the former St. John’s Church from 1838 in the middle.

For more Edinburgh street views visit our Edinburgh Architecture blog post.

Click for larger view:

Edinburgh Panorama street view photography

For classic view and more infos about the street:

Edinburgh Streetview Photography Scotland

We documented several more streetline views in the Old Town and New Town of Edinburgh (see Edinburgh blog post) including the complete Royal Mile. This section of the Royal Mile (Lawnmarket) has been published before:

Scotland Royal Mile Photography

And a preview of the Royal Mile along the High Street:

Edinburgh Royal Mile Panorama

Another unfinnished preview of the Jenners department store in the New Town:

Edinburgh Jenners Preview

Rouen | France | Rue du Gros-Horloge | Week 19

Rouen [latin: Rotomagus], was founded by the tribe of the Veliocasses as Ratumacos, lies about 100 km north-west of Paris and 200 km south of London on the shores of the river Seine. 2nd largest city in the Normandy and 33rd largest city in France.

Population: 111.000 [2013] | 103.000 [1990] | 123.000 [1931] | 116.000 [1901]

The roman Rotomagus was the second most important city of the roman province Gallia after Lugdunum (Lyon). It has been the seat of a bishop since the 4th century. Rouen was captured by the Normans in the 9th century and became the first capital of the Duchy of Normandy in the early 10th century. After the French conquered it again in 1204 it once again belonged to the brittish crown from 1419 to 1449. In late medieval times Rouen was one of the largest european cities with about 40.000 inhabitants. It was here that Joan of Arc was burned at the stake in 1431. Today the city is known for its gothic cathedral and for having the largest number of preserved timber framed buildings in France.

The Rue du Gros-Horloge is a grand example for half-timbered buildings in Rouen. Indeed it is the major street between the cathedral square, we see the Rouen Cathedral at the left edge, and the old marketsquare – the Place de Vieux Marché. The street is named after Rouen’s second landmark, the Gros-Horloge, situated a little further down the right side of the street. It is a fourteenth-century astronomical clock, prominently placed at the side of a tower crossing the street and facing the cathedral.

Find more material from the Normandy in our Normandy overview.

Click for larger view:

Rouen France street view framework version

For classic view and more infos about the street:

Rouen France Panorama half timbered framed

We documented several more streets in Rouen, including more stretches of the Rue du Gros-Horloge, for example (unfinnished):

Image Rouen street view block

And a section following the main panorama further down the right ending at the Gros-Horloge (unfinnished):

Rouen Gros-Horloge Normandie

Here is an unfinnished preview of a little side street, Rue Ecuyere:

Rouen Fachwerk Frankreich

Previously published from Rouen: Rue Ganterie

Rouen street view block image

Kalovy Vary | Czech Republic | Stará Louka | Week 18

Karlovy Vary [english: Carlsbad; german: Karlsbad], assumed to be founded by Charles IV, Holy Roman Emperor and Czech King around 1350, lies about 120 km west of Prague and 150 km south of Leipzig at the confluence of the rivers Ohre and Teplá. 20th largest city in the Czech Republic.

Population: 50.000 [2014] | 56.000 [1991] | 55.000 [1930]

Emperor Charles IV, who appraised the healing power of the hot springs in the area, gave city privileges to the town, which was subsequently named after him. From 1526 Bohemia including Karlovy Vary belonged to the Habsburg Monarchy. In the 18th and 19th century Karlsbad gained more and more importance as the foremost spa town in central europe. Its visitors included Tsar Peter the Great, Goethe, Karl Marx, Morzart, Richard Wagner, Atatürk, Bach, Beethoven and Sigmund Freud amongst others. After World War II the german majority population was expelled from Karlsbad and the Czech Republic. Since 1989 the city is regaining its former spa town status, attracting international tourists, especially a large number of russian visitors.

The Stara Louka (german: Alte Wiese which means old meadow) lies at the centre of the Spa Area of the city along the Teplá river. It is regarded its most picturesque street and main esplanade. Here the valley is very narrow and the hills start right behind these buildings with a popular viewpoint pavillon seen above. A little further to the left the Art Nouveau Grandhotel Pupp is situated on this street, the major setting of the James Bond movie „Casino Royale“.

Find more material from Karlovy Vary in our Czech Republic overview.

Click for larger view:

Foto Karlsbad Alte Wiese Tschechien

For classic view and more infos about the street (german link):

Karlovy Vary Stara Louka

An alternative view of the Stara Louka as a classic panorama:

Karlovy Vary Stara Louka

Another street view (work in progress) from Carlsbad:

Kalrsbad Panorama Preview

Munich | Germany | Residenz München | Week 17

Munich [german: München], first mentioned 1158, lies 350 km west of Vienna, 300 km north of Venice and 500 km south of Berlin on the shores of the Isar river. It is the 3rd lagest city in Germany and 19th largest city in Europe.

Population: 1.439.000 [2014] | 1.229.000 [1990] | 729.000 [1930] | 500.000 [1900]

Munich has become the seat of a bavarian duke in 1255 and in 1506 it became capital of all of Bavaria. Munich hosted the 1972 Olympic Games and is home to the Oktoberfest, the world’s largest Volksfest. The city is a financial and cultural centre of Germany and home to Bayern München, one of the most prominent football clubs of europe.

Here we see the complete west side of the Munich Residenz, which had been the Residence of the Bavarian Rulers from 1508 to 1918. The Residenz is the largest city palace of germany. The main facade here was built as the Maximillianische Residenz in the early 17th century and is dominated by two portals flanked by lions and a statue of the mother of god as Patrona Bavariae. On the right end we see the side facade of the Königsbau next to the Max-Joseph-Square.

We have captured a number of Streetlines in the bavarian capital, find a summary of the material we worked on in our Munich overview.

Click for larger view:

Munich Residenz Residence

For classic view and more infos about the square (german link):

Muenchen Residenz

Wroclaw | Poland | Rynek | Week 16

Wroclaw [german: Breslau], first mentioned as Wortizlawa around 900, lies ca. in the middle of the triangle Berlin – Warsaw – Vienna about 250-300 km away from each capital, 4th largest city in Poland, 61st largest city in europe.

Population: 633.000 [2014] | 641.000 [1990] | 625.000 [1933] | 422.000 [1900]

Wroclaw is a european capital of culture in 2016.

Wroclaw has been the capital of the historical region Silesia [german: Schlesien] and is the capital of the Lower Silesian Voivodeship in Poland today. It is the seat of a roman-catholic arch bishop and an evangelic Diocese. In the 15th century it was a member of the Hanseatic League. Together with Silesia Wroclaw has had a very changeful history, belonging successively to Poland, Bohemia, Hungary, Austria, Prussia and Germany until 1945. Then the population was completely replaced and the Germans had to leave the city, while Poles that had to leave areas around Lviv in the east had to move in.

The Rynek [engl: Ring] has historically been called the „Breslauer Ring“ and is the main market square of the city. It is an unusual square in the sense that it has a large middle block of buildings (incl. the town hall) with small alleys going through. Hence there are eight sides of the square, the four larger outsides and four inner sides. Here we see the south side, historically called the „Goldene-Becher-Seite“ [engl: the golden cup side] or „Seite beym alten Galgen“ [engl: side at the old gibbet]. Even if it looks historic, almost all buildings on this side had been destroyed in WWII and later been reconstructed resembling the facades of the early 19th century.

Earlier we have published two more outer sides of the Rynek, the westside and the northside:

Wroclaw Rynek Photography Panorama Image Pic

Wroclaw Breslau Großer Ring Nordseite Rynek

Click for larger view:

Photography Wroclaw Rynek Foto Image Picture Panorama

For classic view and more infos about the square (german link):

Breslau Großer Ring Südseite

We did document several more streets and views from Wroclaw, yet unfinnished, so we can add a few previews here:

Der Tritt oder Mittelblock des Breslauer Ring

one side of the middle block on Rynek

Bezirksgericht in Wroclaw, Podwale

the former prison (built 1844-1887) at the Stadtgraben (now Podwale) which is now a district court

Policji Wroclaw Podwale

the Police Headquarter (built 1927) in Podwale as well

Architektur Breslau Polen

buildings along the street circle around the old town at Kazimierza Wielkiego

 

 

Zwickau | Germany | Hauptmarkt | Week 15

Zwickau, founded in the 12th century, lies 60 km south of Leipzig and about 150 km northwest of Prague at the foot of the ore mountains [german: Erzgebirge], 4th largest city in the german state Saxony and 88th largest city in Germany (2014).

Population: 91.000 (2014) | 122.000 (1988) | 85.000 (1930) | 56.000 (1900)

Zwickau quickly gained importance after its foundation and was a free imperial city in the early 14th century. Besides Wittenberg it was an early centre of the Lutheran Reformation. From the 15th to the 20th century Zwickau was a centre of the mining industry in Germany, especially for hard-coal from Zwickau and silver from the ore mountains. Hence the city played an important role in german industrialisation and was for centuries one of the main economic and cultural centres of Saxony. It is also a cradle of the german automobile industry with Audi and Horch being founded in the city, while during the GDR times it was the city of the Trabant, the most well known car of the eastern bloc.

Here we see a night view in christmas lighting of the southern side of the main market square (Hauptmarkt), which includes two of the cities main buildings, the Gewandhaus on the left and the town hall in the centre. The Gewandhaus (cloth merchants‘ hall) was built in the 16th century and today serves as the main theatre of the city. The town hall was built in 1404 and features the elaborate city emblem above its portal. The last building on this side of the square on the far right, which was unfortunately hidden by christmas stalls for this photography, is the birthplace (and museum) for the famous composer Robert Schuhmann.

Visit our archive for other streetline panoramas from Saxony.

Click for larger view:

Zwickau Gewandhaus Rathaus Hauptmarkt

For classic view (english link):

Zwickau Gewandhaus

Strasbourg | France | La Petit France | Week 14

Strasbourg [german: Straßburg; dutch: Straatsburg], founded by the Romans as Argentoratum in 12 BCE, lies 100 km west of Stuttgart, 200 km south of Frankfurt and about 450 km east of Paris, largest city of the french region Alsace and 7th largest city in France.

Population: 274.000 (2012) | 252.000 (1990) | 181.000 (1931) | 151.00 (1900)

Strasbourg is the capital of the Alsace (german: Elsass) region, however today it is also one of the capitals of europe, being the seat of the several european institutions like the Council of Europe and the European Parliament as well as the International Institute of Human Rights. Strasbourg’s historic city centre, the Grande Île, has been declared an UNESCO world heritage site in 1988. Historically the city often changed sides between german or french rulers. Since the late 17th century mainly french, german was still the main language till the end of WWII. Strasbourg is an important economic centre and its port is the second largest on the Rhine after Dusiburg, Germany.

La Petit France is a historic quarter in the centre of Strasbourg, part of its UNESCO world heritage site. Here the river Ill forms a number of channels with half timbered houses lining up on the shores and the narrow streets, most of them dating from the 16th and 17th century. La Petit France is now one of Strasbourg’s main tourist attractions.

Visit our archive for other streetline panoramas from France.

Click for larger view:

Panorama Strasbourg La Petit France

For classic view (german link):

Strasbourg Petit France

In our archive other streets and squares from Strasbourg are documented. Two unfinnished examples can be seen below.

Grand Rue

Strasbourg Grand Rue Panorama

Rue des Grandes Arcades

Architecture Strasbourg Rue des Grandes Arcades

Istanbul | Turkey | Istiklal Avenue | week 13

Istanbul [old english: Constantinople; old german: Konstantinopel, Byzanz], founded as Byzantium by greek settlers around 660 BCE, lies on both sides of the Bosphorus partly on the european and partly on the asian continent, largest city in europe (though not completely situated on the european continent) and 5th largest city in the world.

Population: 14.377.000 (2014) | 6.620.000 (1990) | 741.000 (1935) | 943.000 (1900)

Istanbul is the most prominent and most populous city in Turkey, though the capital is Ankara. However it was the imperial capital for sixteen centuries for the East Roman Empire, the Byzantine, the Latin (being called Constantinople during all that time) and the Ottoman Empire. It is still the seat of the Orthodox Patriarchate. Istanbul is amongst the ten most visited tourist destinations in the world, with its attractive historical centre (an UNESCO world heritage site), its cosmopolitan Beyoglu side, the Bosphorous strait and its asian side.

This is a section of the 1.4 km long Istiklal Avenue (turkish: Istiklal Caddesi) meaning Independence Avenue, also  known by its former name Grande Rue de Péra. Until the 1920s it was the cosmopolitan artery of Péra, where lots of greek, italian, french and other foreigners, and especially merchants, lived for centuries. Péra (also called Galata) itself developed as a city next to Constantinople across the Golden Horn under Genoese (and partly Venetian) control from the 13th century. Most of the late Ottoman Style buildings in the street date to the 19th and early 20th century. The street experienced a long decline in the 20th century especially following anti-greek movements between the 50s and 70s. However since the 1990s the street regains its popularity, the old trams run through it again and buildings get restored, as can also be seen in this streetscape panorama.

We documented a number of streets and places in Istanbul, find a preview in our Istanbul overview.

Click for larger view:

Istiklal Avenue Panorama Turkey

For classic view and further details visit the archive:

Cityscape Istanbul Panorama