Istanbul | Turkey | Istiklal Avenue | week 13

Istanbul [old english: Constantinople; old german: Konstantinopel, Byzanz], founded as Byzantium by greek settlers around 660 BCE, lies on both sides of the Bosphorus partly on the european and partly on the asian continent, largest city in europe (though not completely situated on the european continent) and 5th largest city in the world.

Population: 14.377.000 (2014) | 6.620.000 (1990) | 741.000 (1935) | 943.000 (1900)

Istanbul is the most prominent and most populous city in Turkey, though the capital is Ankara. However it was the imperial capital for sixteen centuries for the East Roman Empire, the Byzantine, the Latin (being called Constantinople during all that time) and the Ottoman Empire. It is still the seat of the Orthodox Patriarchate. Istanbul is amongst the ten most visited tourist destinations in the world, with its attractive historical centre (an UNESCO world heritage site), its cosmopolitan Beyoglu side, the Bosphorous strait and its asian side.

This is a section of the 1.4 km long Istiklal Avenue (turkish: Istiklal Caddesi) meaning Independence Avenue, also  known by its former name Grande Rue de Péra. Until the 1920s it was the cosmopolitan artery of Péra, where lots of greek, italian, french and other foreigners, and especially merchants, lived for centuries. Péra (also called Galata) itself developed as a city next to Constantinople across the Golden Horn under Genoese (and partly Venetian) control from the 13th century. Most of the late Ottoman Style buildings in the street date to the 19th and early 20th century. The street experienced a long decline in the 20th century especially following anti-greek movements between the 50s and 70s. However since the 1990s the street regains its popularity, the old trams run through it again and buildings get restored, as can also be seen in this streetscape panorama.

We documented a number of streets and places in Istanbul, find a preview in our Istanbul overview.

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Istiklal Avenue Panorama Turkey

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Cityscape Istanbul Panorama

Düsseldorf | Germany | Königsallee | Week 12

Düsseldorf [Dutch: Dusseldorp], founded in 12th century, got city rights in 1288, lies on the shores of the Rhine, 30 km north of Cologne and 170 km east of Brussels, 2nd largest city in the Bundesland Nordrhein Westphalen (Northrhine-Westphalia), 7th largest in Germany and 66th largest in europe.

Population: 605.000 (2014) | 576.000 (1990) | 478.000 (1930) | 214.000 (1900)

Düsseldorf is the capital of the german Bundesland Northrhine-Westphalia and a centre of the Rhine-Ruhr Metropolitan Area. A newly founded city of the 12th century it was named after the small river Düssel which flows into the Rhine here. It became the residence city of the Duchy of Berg in the 14th century. Today Düsseldorf is an important trade fair city and economic centre in germany. It is also well known for its carnival and its art academy (the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf).

Here we have one block along the west side of the Königsallee in Düsseldorf. Locally nicknamed the „Kö“, the street is one of the main luxury shopping streets of germany. This however is its so called „quiet side“, with mainly banks and hotels residing, instead of shops. The street is also known for its landscaped canal, lined with large old sycamore trees, running along the old site of the cities fortifications.

Visit our archive for other streetline panoramas from the Bundesland Northrhine-Westphalia.

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Kö Königsallee Düsseldorf Ansicht View

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Düsseldorf Kö Königsallee luxury shopping

In our archive other streets from Düsseldorf have been documented, including the Kurze Strasse, the Mittelstrasse or the market square amongst others. A finnished panorama of the media harbour has been published to our archive before (english link):

Medienhafen in Düsseldorf, Germany

Deauville | France | Rue du Casino | week 11

Deauville, first mentioned around 1060 as A Enilla, lies on the Normandy coast, west of Trouville, separated by the river Touques, also about 175 km west of Paris.

Population: 3.800 (2012) | 4.300 (1990) | 4.800 (1931)  | 2.900 (1901)

Deauville was just a small farming village up to the 1850s. Then Charles de Morny, half brother of Napoleon III., transformed it into an elegant seaside resort. With its race courses, marinas, villas, harbour, Grand Casino, international Festivals and the close proximity to Paris it became the „Queen of the Norman Beaches“. Deauville is home to several festivals and horse events throughout the year, the most prestigious being the Deauville American Film Festival. Marcel Proust worked on his novel „In search of lost time“ during his summers in Deauville.

With its development into the prime seaside resort in the Normandy, Deauville attracted the wealthy and famous french (including Coco Chanel, André Citroen, Yves Saint Laurent, Josephine Baker, Gustave Flaubert amongst others) and became the Parisian Riviera. Hence one could and can also find the high-class fashion labels in Deauville, with a concentration in the Rue du Casino (Casino Street), right opposite the Casino Barrière de Deauville. The flamboyant style of half timbered houses in Deauville is a product of the neo norman style of the late 19th century.

Visit our archive for other streetline panoramas from the Normandy.

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Architecture Deauville France

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neonormannischer Stil in Frankreich, Deauville

Potsdam | Germany | Kurfürstenstraße | week 10

Potsdam [Sorbian: Podstupim], first mentioned in 993, lies directly south-west of Berlin and 120 km north of Leipzig on the shores of the river Havel, largest city of the state Brandenburg and 45th largest in Germany.

Population: 164.000 (2014) | 140.000 (1990) | 73.000 (1930) | 60.000 (1900)

Potsdam is the capital of the german state Brandenburg, which surrounds Berlin. From the 17th century the city has been a residence city of the Prussian Monarchy, resulting in several castles and parks, including the famous palace Sanssouci, all of which are included in the UNESCO world heritage list. The Filmstudio Babelsberg was the first large movie studio of the world (Metropolis by Fritz Lang was made here) and the Alexander Nevsky Memorial Church is the oldest russian orthodox church of western europe.

Here we see a carré of the Dutch Quarter (german: Holländisches Viertel) in Kurfürstenstrasse. The dutch quarter was built by architect Jan Bouman 1732-1742 on order of the prussian king Friedrich Wilhelm I. to attract dutch workers to the rapidly growing city. Potsdam’s dutch quarter is europe’s largest collection of dutch style houses outside the Netherlands.

Visit our archive for other streetline panoramas from Germany.

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Potsdam Holländisches Viertel Straßenansicht

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Potsdam Holländisches Viertel Foto Bild

In our archive other streets from Potsdam have been documented, including the Brandenburger Strasse and the Nauener Tor which continues the panorama above and can be seen in a preview below.

Nauener Tor Potsdam

San Bartolomé de Tirajana | Spain | Fataga | Week 9

San Bartolomé, the Guanches (the old canary people) have settled in the area at least 2.000 years ago, lies in the south of Gran Canaria, largest municipality by area and 4th largest by population on Gran Canaria

Population: 54.000 (2014) | 24.500 (1991) | 4.700 (1900)
Population Fataga: 370 (2011) | 650 (1900)

San Bartolomé de Tirajana, Tirajana refers to a tribe of the Guanches that settled here before the spanish invaded Gran Canaria. Besides the historical village Fataga, San Bartolomé is also known for the sand dunes, the beaches and the lighthouse of Maspalomas. It is one of the touristic centres of the island Gran Canaria.

Fataga (Photography by Victor Lavilla) is a small village with historic significance within the municipality of San Bartolomé de Tirajana. It lies in its mountainous region in the Barranco de Fataga, also known as the „Valley of a thousand palms“. Here some of the final battles between the Guanches and the Spanish took place. In the 16th century the village was known as Adfatagad. Today, with its preserved centre it is a role model for a characteristic village of Gran Canaria, attracts large numbers of tourists and has been declared an UNESCO world heritage site.

Visit our archive for other streetline panoramas from Spain.

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Fataga Gran Canaria Panorama Photography

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Fataga Gran Canaria

Cologne | Germany | Schildergasse | Week 8

Cologne [German: Köln, Latin: Colonia], founded over 2.000 years ago, lies in western Germany on the shores of the Rhine, ca. 160 km east of Brussels and 50 km south of the Ruhr region, largest city in the german state Northrhine-Westphalia, 4th largest in Germany and 29th in Europe.

Population: 1.047.00 (2014) | 953.000 (1990) | 740.000 (1930) | 372.000 (1900)

Cologne was declared a roman city as Colonia Claudia Ara Agrippensium (CCAA) in the year 50 and was capital of the province Germania inferior. Since then it always retained its prominent role in the region, has been a member of the Hanseatic League, has always been a key city of the Catholics and in more recent history also been famous for its Carnival. Cologne is part of the Rhine-Ruhr metropolitan region (the 6th largest in europe) and home to one UNESCO world heritage site – the Cologne Cathedral, the largest gothic church of Northern Europe.

The Schildergasse (literal english: shields alley) is, despite its modern looks, the second oldest street of Cologne, having been the major east-west street of the roman city. Today it is the cities major shopping street (and one of the most frequented in Germany) with several big department stores and high street labels. Cologne was one of the most severe hit german cities in WWII, so the old town looks rather modern today, as can be seen in this street section. The only historic building here is the Haus Schierenberg, built in 1894.

Visit our archive for other streetline panoramas from the Bundesland Northrhine-Westphalia.

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Cologne Schildergasse Panorama

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Schildergasse Shopping Panorama Foto Image

Helsingør | Denmark | Stengade | Week 7

Helsingør [old english: Elsinore] founded in the 1420s, lies in the north east of the danish main island Zealand on the narrowest point of the Øresund, 40 km north of Copenhagen, west of the swedish city Helsingborg across the Øresund, 13th largest city of Denmark

Population:  46.500 (2015) | 34.400 (2006)

Helsingør has for centuries been the harbour where passing ships had to pay the Sound Dues, for a long time the major income for the danish crown. Today there is an important and much frequented ferry line to Helsingborg in Sweden. However the city is even more famous for Kronborg castle, an UNESCO world heritage site and the place where Shakespeare’s play Hamlet was set. The old harbour has been turned into the Kulturhavn Kronborg (Culture Harbour Kronborg).

The Stengade is the major shopping street of Helsingør, running soutwest to northeast parallel to the sea in the south. Here on the east end of the street, there are some administrative buildings and fewer shops, which are concentrated towards the west end of the street.

Visit our archive for other streetline panoramas from Denmark.

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Cityscape Helsingor Danmark

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street panorama denmark Danmark

In our archive other sections of Stengade are included, as well as other streets from Helsingør and the Domkirke. Two unfinnished examples can be seen below.

Sct. Annagade

panorama Sct anna gade helsingor denmark

Domkirke

linear Domkirke in Helsingor

Wels | Austria | Stadtplatz | Week 6

Wels, city foundation as the roman Ovilava in the 2nd century, situated centrally in Upper Austria on the shores of the river Traun, ca. 200 km west of Vienna and 100 km east of Salzburg, 2nd largest city of the Bundesland Oberösterreich (Upper Austria) and 8th largest city in Austria.

Population: 60.000 (2015) | 52.600 (1991) | 26.000 (1934) | 17.000 (1900)

Wels is a Statuarstadt and seat of the county of Wels-Land in Upper Austria. As Ovilava it was an important city in roman times and became capital of the roman province of Noricum Ripensis. An important regional trade centre in the Middle Ages it was often visited by Emperor Maximilian I, who died at Wels Castle in 1519.

This is the north side of the Stadtplatz, the central square in Wels, from the Ledererturm in the west to the Stadtpfarrkirche in the East. The Stadtplatz originates from the 13th century and some buildings still date back to that time. The Ledererturm is the last remaining tower of the medieval walls of Wels and its design dates from the early 17th century. Its name refers to the medieval Lederer business (english: Tanning).

Visit our archive for more streetline panoramas from Austria.

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Austria Wels Stadtplatz City Square Ledererturm

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Wels Stadtplatz Ledererturm Oberösterreich

We also photographed the south side of the Stadtplatz with the town hall, the Salome Alt House and the Kremsmünstererhof to be finnished later. Two more previews of the Medien Kultur Haus (former Sparkasse) and the Bahnhofstrasse can be seen below:

Altes Sparkassengebäude Wels

Wels Bahnhofstrasse Österreich

 

Amsterdam | Netherlands | Oudezijds Voorburgwal | Week 5

Amsterdam [Yiddish: Mokum], first mentioned as Aemstelredamme in 1275, situated centrally in the Netherlands on the mouth of the Amstel and the Ij into the Ijsselmeer, largest city of the Netherlands, 41st largest city in Europe.

Population: 826.000 (2015) | 695.000 (1990) | 757.000 (1930) | 524.000 (1900)

Amsterdam is the capital of the Netherlands, but not the seat of its parliament (Den Haag). It is known worldwide for its canal system, the so-called Grachtengordel, and its architecture (also an UNESCO world heritage site). In the 17th century, the Dutch Golden Age, it was probably the wealthiest city in the world. The offices of the East India Trading Company became the first stock exchange in the world in 1602. It was also for centuries a safe haven for europe’s jews and they called it the „Jerusalem of the West“. Anne Frank lived in Amsterdam. Today Amsterdam is home to several world renowned museums.

This night view of the Oudezijds Voorburgwal depicts the typical dutch gabled houses along Amsterdam’s canals. It lies within the De Wallen district of central Amsterdam and is also part of Amsterdams Red Light District (dutch Rosse Buurt), as can obviously be seen with some of the red windows and sex shops here. The Oudezijds Voorburgwal is one of the most frequented canals in Amsterdam and one can find more than a hundred national listed buildings along it, including De Oude Kerk, Amsterdam’s oldest church. This view of the iced canal is relatively rare and was taken in february 2012.

Visit our archive for more streetline panoramas from Amsterdam.

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Panorama Amsterdam Red Light District

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Amsterdam Canals Grachten Panorama

 

Lübeck | Germany | An der Untertrave | Week 4

Lübeck [latin: Lubeca], first settled as Liubice by Slavs in the 8th century, first mentioned in 1076, lies on the Baltic Sea 65 km east of Hamburg, 2nd largest city in the state Schleswig-Holstein, 35th largest city in Germany

Population: 213.000 (2015) | 213.000 (1989) | 130.000 (1936) | 82.000 (1900)

Lübeck has been the „Queen of the Hanse“ (leading city of the Hanseatic League) from the late 13th to the 15th century and during that time was also one of the biggest and most important german cities. The remaining parts of the medival old town, including the famous Holstentor, have been declared an UNESCO world heritage site in 1987. Also Lübeck is known for the literature of the brothers Thomas and Heinrich Mann, as well as the Buddenbrookhaus made famous in the novel „Buddenbrooks„.

This panorama by Lutz Riedel represents a stretch along the Untertrave, a section of the Trave river. Some important buildings here are the St. Marienkirche (St. Mary Church) in the back, the Marzipan Storehouses right of the centre and the Carl Tesdorpf building (an eyxclusive whine trader) left of the centre. we also see two streets going into the old town, the Alfstrasse next to the church and the Mengstrasse in the middle, which goes up to the Buddenbrookhaus. The large Marzipan Storehouses still remind of the important role the city played in the production and trade of Marzipan in the 19th and 20th century.

You can also find another street view of the Mengstrasse in our Lübeck archive.

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Luebeck Marzipan Speicher Fassade Bild

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Lübeck Marzipan Speicher