Vienna | Austria | Graben | Week 32

Vienna [german: Wien; hungarian: Bécs; latin: Vindobona], first known settlement as Vedunia by the Celts, but earlier settlements existed. Vienna lies ca. in the middle between Prague (250 km to the nortwest) and Budapest (220 km to the southeast) only about 50 km west of the slovak capital Bratislava. It is the largest city of Austria and the 12th largest city in Europe.

Population: 1.840.000 [2016] | 1.540.000 [1991] | 1.936.000 [1934] | 1.769.000 [1900]

The historic centre of Vienna is one large UNESCO world heritage site. It developed mostly between the end of the osman siege of Vienna in 1683 and WWI and is shaped by the architectural ensembles in baroque, neo-classical and Art Nouveau style of the Habsburg Empire. Following its celtic roots Vienna was a roman castrum and city called Vindobona for four centuries. It first rose to prominence when the Babenberger family moved its residence to the then minor city in the 12th century. Its real height of power however came with the Habsburg family in the 15th century. They made it the capital of the Habsburg Empire and the Holy Roman Empire, withstood two osman sieges and created the Austro-Hungarian Empire after the congress of Vienna in 1815. The city became a world centre for music, arts and science in the 19th century (Mozart, Beethoven, Klimt, Freud etc.). Today Vienna is regarded a global city and home to several international organisations like the OPEC, the IAEO, the OSZE and of course, one of the home cities of the UNO. In Europe Vienna plays the role of a bridging city between Eastern and Western Europe.

Our cityscape above presents the Graben, an area once part of the wall of the roman castell, that later became a prestigious central shopping street with grand historicism and Art Nouveau architecture. Here we see, for example, the Anker-Haus by Otto Wagner on the left, the Grabenhof in the centre and the Husaren-Haus by Josef Hackhofer on the right edge.

Click for larger view:

Österreich Wien Graben Straßenansicht Architektur

For classic view and more infos about the place (german link):

Europe Habsburg Empire Austria Vienna Graben

Find a step-by-step sequence video of the composition of this streetline below:

Also finalized and published are these views of the Schwarzenberg-Square and the Wienzeile. Find more streetlines in our Vienna overview (german link).

Wien Schwarzenbergplatz Architekturfotografie Bild Image Foto

Wien Vienna Wienzeilenhäuser

A preview of a ministry building in the Hintere Zollamtsstrasse.

Wien Hintere Zollamtsstrasse Architektur modern

A preview of the Hofburg Theatre at the Ringstrasse of Vienna.

Panorama Wien Hofburgtheater

 

Görlitz | Germany | Augustastrasse | Week 30

Görlitz [polish: Zgorzelec], first mention as Goreliz in 1071. It is the easternmost city in germany, lying about 80 km east of Dresden, 120 km west of Wroclaw (Breslau) and 120 km north of Prague. Görlitz is the 6th largest city in the german state Saxony and the largest within the region Upper Lusatia (Oberlausitz).

Population: 55.000 [2015] | 72.000 [1990] | 94.000 (1930) | 81.000 [1900]

Görlitz is especially known for its well preserved old town, it is member of the working group historic cities in germany. From its early times the city belonged to the bohemian kingdom, later it became part of Saxony, then Silesia (in Prussia) and finally Germany (incl. GDR). It was a strong trade city in late medieval times, esp. due to its monopoly for woad trade in Bohemia. Görlitz was a member of the Lusatian League and as such held rights similar to free imperial cities for some time. In 1945 the new border between Germany and Poland cut through the city along the Neisse river. It’s eastern part is now an independent city – Zgorcelec in Poland. Economically the city has a long history in the production of trams and trains. Nowadays the city is also a favourite spot for big movie productions, earning it its nickname Görliwood.

The street front above is a section of Augustastrasse, a street full of examples of historicism style, which is common in the areas around the old town centre. Görlitz is also known as a so called Pensionopolis, an attractive city with relatively low rents that attracts the elder and retired people. While the city experienced an economic decline since 1990 it still managed to restore the majority of its historic buildings – in large parts thanks to the anonymous Altstadtmillion (old town million). Between 1995 and 2016 each year the city received an anonymous amount of one million Deutsche Mark (later that amount in Euro) to be spent for reconstructing the old town. The results can be seen all over Görlitz.

Click for larger view:

Architektur Görlitz Sachsen Lausitz Schlesien

For classic view and more infos about the place (german here):

Görlitz Architecture Panorama

We documented more streets and places in Görlitz. Find some previews below. For more views from saxon cities follow the link to our Saxony archive.

A panorama of the central block on the lower market square (Untermarkt).

Untermarkt Görlitz Panorama Foto

The Brüderstrasse between Obermarkt and Untermarkt with the Silesian Museum (left).

streetview Görlitz Brüderstrasse old town streetline

A section of the Obermarkt (Upper Market) from 2011.

Oberlausitz Görlitz Architektur Fassaden

The main station.

Görlitz Bahnhof train station

Frankfurt | Germany | Mainufer | Week 28

Frankfurt am Main [italian: Francoforte sul Meno], first mention as Franconofurd in 794, but probably inhabited since the Romans. Frankfurt is situated ca. in the middle of the line Brussels – Prague and about 400 km south of Hamburg. It is the largest city (but not the capital) of the german state Hesse, the 5th largest in Germany and the 48th largest in Europe.

Population: 733.000 [2015] | 645.000 [1990] | 541.000 [1930] | 289.000 [1900]

Frankfurt had been one of the most important cities in the Holy Roman Empire ever since the division of Charlemagne’s Frankish Empire in 843. From 1147 to 1792 most german kings and emperors were crowned in Frankfurt. The city became a free imperial city in 1220 and kept this status till Napoleon. After a brief period of dependance it was a free city again until it was annexed by Prussia in 1866. Frankfurt gained a status as an important trade fair city as early as the 13th century and it established an early currency exchange system in the late 16th century. Today it is the leading financial centre of continental europe, a leading trade fair city and a significant cultural and commercial centre, including central europe’s busiest airport.

This linear panorama view depicts the northern shore of the river Main from the Bankenviertel (banking district) on the left along the central old town of Frankfurt up to the Alte Brücke (old bridge) on the right. Prominent features are the banks skyscrapers on the left, which form the basis for all classic skyline images of Frankfurt, in the centre of the panorama we see the towers around the central square Römerberg and further to the right we see the large Frankfurt Cathedral (german: Kaiserdom St. Bartholomäus). One main feature is missing from this view however, in the middle the river is crossed by the Eiserne Steg bridge, a pedestrian connection to the south bank. See our archive version for more infos, backgrounds and an explanation of the bridge’s dissapearing.

Click for larger view:

Frankfurt Mainkai mit Bankenviertel und Skyline im Panorama

For classic view and more infos about the place (german link):

Frankfurt Mainkai Panorama

We documented more streets and places, which can be seen in our Frankfurt overview.

Some of these examples:

Kaiserstrasse

Kaiserstrasse streetview Frankfurt panorama image foto

Römerberg | City Hall | Nikolaikirche (unfinnished)

Römer Frankfurt Markt Römerberg

Gallusanlage (unfinnished)

Gallusanlage Frankfurt Main Commerzbank

Genoa | Italy | Via XX Settembre | Week 26

Genoa [italian: Genova; latin, german: Genua; french: Gênes], oldest references from the 6th century BC as (a probably greek city) Stalia in Liguria but might have been inhabited much earlier. Lies on the mediterranean coast at the centre of the ligurian coastal arch, south of Milan and in the centre of a triangle with Marseille (west, 300 km), Zürich (north, 325 km) and Rome (southeast, 400km). 6th largest city in Italy, 69th largest city in europe.

Population: 587.000 [2015] | 679.000 [1991] | 591.000 [1931] | 378.000 [1901]

Genoa, also called La Superba (the proud one), is especially known for its glorious past. The Romans renamed it Genua and gave it municipal rights. The city had its golden times as the Maritime Republic of Genoa, especially from the 12th to the end of the 14th century. During that time it was one of the leading maritime powers in the Mediterranean with colonies in the Middle East, the Aegean, Sicily and Northern Africa. It controlled Liguria, Piedmont, Sardinia, Corsica and Nice and had trade outposts in many places, especially in Spain and Constantinople. It had another golden time from the 16th century to the French Revolution when the genoese banks collaborated closely with the spanish crown. A famous son of the city was Christopher Columbus, born here in 1451. During the 19th and 20th century Genoa established itself as a ship-building and industrial powerhouse of Italy. Its Palazzi dei Rolli and the Le Strade Nuove („the new streets“) gave the city an UNESCO world heritage site and in 2004 it was a european capital of culture.

Our streetline presents a section of the  southside of Via XX Settembre in Genoa. This major east-west street from the city centre (at Piazza de Ferrari) towards the East and San Vincenzo developed in the late 19th century. The street is crossed by the bridge Ponte Monumentale in its middle, which we can see at the left edge. It is a major shopping and promenading street of the Genoese and lined by representative buildings from the period, especially some of the finest Art Nouveau buildings in the region.

Click for larger view:

Street view Streetline Streetscape Genoa Genova Italy Italia

For classic view and more infos about the place:

Via XX Settembre Genoa Genova Italy Italia

We documented many more streets and places in Genoa. Find some unfinnished examples below.

Strada Nuova Palazzi dei Rolli Genova Genoa

Via Garibaldi | Strada Nuova

Piazza Caricamento Genoa Genua

Piazza Caricamento

Palazzo San Giorgio Genoa Italy Sights

Palazzo San Giorgio

Avignon | France | Palais des Papes | Week 25

Avignon [latin: Avenio], founded in the 6th century BC as Aouenion by greek settlers from Massalia (Marseille). Lies on the left bank of the Rhône river ca. 80 km north of Marseille and 200 km south of Lyon. Avignon is the largest city of the Department Vaucluse, the 5th largest in the Région Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur and Nr. 46 in all of France.

Population: 90.000 [2013] | 87.000 [1990] | 57.000 [1931] | 47.000 [1901]

Avignon has always been situated at the border of different countries, it belonged amongst others to the Greek, the Romans, the Franks, the Kingdom of Provence and Arles, the german Holy Roman Empire, the Papal State and finally to France following the French Revolution. Once in history Avignon became an important political centre – that was after the Pope decided to move its seat from Rome to Avignon in 1309, chosen for its proximity to the papal ruled Comtat Venaissin. For about 70 years the city was the centre of Christianity and served seven popes and two antipopes. Afterwards it still served as a second centre of the pope who sent a papal legate to rule the city. Today the cityscape is still dominated by the gothic 14th century Papal Palace and together with the cathedral and the famous Pont St. Bénézet bridge it earned the city UNESCO world heritage status in 1995.

The short papal rule in Avignon shaped the city more than anything else in its 2.500 years of history, especially with the errection of the Palais des Papes (english: Papal Palace). It was built between 1335 and 1370 by the ruling popes, the main architects were Pierre Poisson (old palace) and Jean de Louvres (new palace). Up until today the palace remains the largest gothic style building in europe. In this panoramic view we see the new palace (Palais-neuf) with the main entrance in the right half, the old palace (Palais-vieux) left of it a little bit to the back and the Avignon Cathedral (Cathédrale Notre-Dame des Doms d’Avignon) left of the Papal Palace. The palace gradually lost its importance and after the french revolution it was used as a military barracks and prison which resulted in the damage of most of its interior and frescos. Since 1906 it is a national conservation project and undergoes restoration ever since.

The Avignon Cathedral was originally built in the 12th century and serves as the seat of the archbishop of Avignon. After restoration in the 19th century a gilded statue of the Virgin Mary was placed atop in 1859.

Find more streetviews and cityscapes from France in our France overview.

Click for larger view:

Palais des Papes Architecture Gothic View Street France

For classic view and more infos about the place:

Palais des Papes France Avignon Panorama

Barcelona | Spain | Passeig de Gracia | Week 24

Barcelona [latin: Barcino; greek: Varkelóni] founded by the Laietani as Barkeno sometime before 250 BC, later restructured by the Carthaginians and Romans. Lies on the mediterranean coast in north-east spain, about 500 km east of Madrid, 900 km south of Paris and 300 km south-west of Marseille. Second largest city in Spain and 17th largest city in europe.

Population: 1.605.000 (2015) | 1.707.000 (1990) | 1.006.000 (1930) | 544.000 (1900)

Barcelona is the capital of the autonomous spanish region Catalonia and its economic centre. It has always played an important rule as a major harbour on the mediterranean coast and is the seat of the Union for the Mediterranean, an organization of european, african and arabian countries. In 1992 it hosted the Olympic Games and it is listed as a UNESCO world heritage site with works by the modernisme architects Antoni Gaudí and Lluís Domènech i Montaner. Gaudís magnum opus, the Basilica Sagrada Familia which was started in 1882 and is scheduled to be finnished in 2026, is a major tourist attraction of europe.

The Passeig de Gràcia is regarded the most elegant street of Barcelona and runs through the Eixample from the Placa de Catalunya in the south to the Gràcia district in the north. Here the leading modernisme architects created several representative buildings in the later 19th and early 20th century. Amongst the architects that worked on this street block we find Lluís Domènech i Montaner with the Casa Lleó-Morera at the left edge, Antoni Gaudí with the famous Casa Batlló, the second last on the right and Josep Puig i Cadafalch with the Casa Amatller on its left side. With all these architects and their distinct styles so close to each other this street block was later famously called the Mansana de la Discordia – meaning at the same time Apple or Block of discord and referencing greek mythology in view of this built competition of Modernisme. Find more infos and detail views in our archive or look for other Barcelona streetlines.

Click for larger view:

Panorama Casa Batllo Passeig de Gracia Amatllo

For classic view and further details visit the archive (german link):

Casa Batllo Antoni Gaudi Barcelona Espana

Another published streetline view of Barcelona is the Placa Reial:

Placa Reial Barcelona

We documented more than 50 streets and places in Barcelona. Find some unfinnished examples below.

Barcelona Via Laietana Architecture Photography

Via Laietana, part of this longer panorama:

Barcelona Via Laietana streetline

Via Laietana

Architecture Barcelona Ronda de la Universitat

Ronda de la Universitat

Parroquia de Christo Rey Church Barcelona

Parroquia De Cristo Rey

 

Canterbury | United Kingdom | St Peter’s Street | Week 23

Canterbury [old german: Kanterburg; welsh: Caergaint], first recorded (BC) as the main settlement of the celtic cantiaci tribe, became a Roman City as Durovernum Cantiacorum in the 1st century AD. Situated 80 km east of London and about 200 km west of Brussels on the shores of the river Stour.

Population: 55.000 [2011] | 43.000 [2001] | 24.000 [1931] | 25.000 [1901]

Canterbury was a capital for the celtic Cantiaci and for the Jute Kingdom of Kent, however its most prominent role has been in church history. Here the oldest church of the english speaking world can be found (St Martin’s Church), St Augustine started his apostle work and the christianisation of England here and the archbishop of Canterbury is the Primate of the Church of England. St Augustine’s Abbey, Canterbury Cathedral and St Martin’s Church form an UNESCO world heritage site. The city is also home to the world’s oldest School, the King’s School. Today the city has one of the strongest economies in the region and is one of the UK’s most visited tourist destinations.

The panorama above shows one of the cities major non-religious landmarks, the Old Weavers House, at the right edge. It was used by the Huguenots and is one of the (still numerous) timber framed 16th and 17th century houses that survived the german Blitz bombings in world war II. St Peter’s street is named after St Peter’s church, which we see a little bit in the back on the left edge. The street connects the High Street at its east end with the Westgate in the west.

To find more published streetline views from the UK visit our United Kingdom archive.

Click for larger view:

Canterbury Cityscape UK Panorama Image

For classic view and more infos about the streetview:

Canterbury Panorama Foto

We have captured some more streetviews in Canterbury a few of which we present here in unfinnished previews:

Canterbury Panorama Buttermarket Cathedral Gate

Cathedral Gate | Buttermarket | Burgate

Canterbury Preview

Great Stour | Westgate Grove

Canterbury High Street

High Street | Royal Museum

Edinburgh | United Kingdom | Victoria Street | Week 20

Edinburgh [scottish gaelic: Dùn Èideann; french: Édimbourg], the hill forth Din Eidyn by the Gododdin tribe was built sometime before 600 AD and the city was founded as a royal burgh in the early 12th century. Situated about 70 km east of Glasgow and ca. 550 km north of London on the southern shore of the Firth of Forth. 2nd largest city in Scotland, 8th largest city in the United Kingdom and 61st largest city in the european union.

Population: 493.000 [2014] | 419.000 [1991] | 439.000 [1991] | 395.000 [1901]

Edinburgh, lying east of Glasgow in the scottish central belt, has been the capital of Scotland since the mid 15th century, hence it is the seat of the Scottish Parliament and of the monarchy in Scotland. The city is a UNESCO world heritage site since 1995, notably for its Old Town with Edinburgh Castle, the Holyrood Palace and the Royal Mile connecting the two, as well as the planned 18th century Georgian New Town. The city is also home to the National Museum and the National Library of Scotland as well as the Scottish National Gallery. Today the city is known for its strong economic, especially in the financial sector and the tourism industry, as well as its cultural festivals, especially the Edinburgh International Festival and the Fringe Festival.

Victoria Street is the historical, being called West Bow then, entrance to the Castle Hill from western direction. It was transformed to its current shape in the early 19th century and renamed Victoria Street when Queen Victoria was crowned. Most buildings were errected in the mid 19th century, though some older buildings remained at the foot of the street. Here we see the grand India Buildings from 1864 on the left and the former St. John’s Church from 1838 in the middle.

For more Edinburgh street views visit our Edinburgh Architecture blog post.

Click for larger view:

Edinburgh Panorama street view photography

For classic view and more infos about the street:

Edinburgh Streetview Photography Scotland

We documented several more streetline views in the Old Town and New Town of Edinburgh (see Edinburgh blog post) including the complete Royal Mile. This section of the Royal Mile (Lawnmarket) has been published before:

Scotland Royal Mile Photography

And a preview of the Royal Mile along the High Street:

Edinburgh Royal Mile Panorama

Another unfinnished preview of the Jenners department store in the New Town:

Edinburgh Jenners Preview

Wels | Austria | Stadtplatz | Week 6

Wels, city foundation as the roman Ovilava in the 2nd century, situated centrally in Upper Austria on the shores of the river Traun, ca. 200 km west of Vienna and 100 km east of Salzburg, 2nd largest city of the Bundesland Oberösterreich (Upper Austria) and 8th largest city in Austria.

Population: 60.000 (2015) | 52.600 (1991) | 26.000 (1934) | 17.000 (1900)

Wels is a Statuarstadt and seat of the county of Wels-Land in Upper Austria. As Ovilava it was an important city in roman times and became capital of the roman province of Noricum Ripensis. An important regional trade centre in the Middle Ages it was often visited by Emperor Maximilian I, who died at Wels Castle in 1519.

This is the north side of the Stadtplatz, the central square in Wels, from the Ledererturm in the west to the Stadtpfarrkirche in the East. The Stadtplatz originates from the 13th century and some buildings still date back to that time. The Ledererturm is the last remaining tower of the medieval walls of Wels and its design dates from the early 17th century. Its name refers to the medieval Lederer business (english: Tanning).

Visit our archive for more streetline panoramas from Austria.

Click for larger view:

Austria Wels Stadtplatz City Square Ledererturm

For classic view and further details visit the archive (for english link click here):

Wels Stadtplatz Ledererturm Oberösterreich

We also photographed the south side of the Stadtplatz with the town hall, the Salome Alt House and the Kremsmünstererhof to be finnished later. Two more previews of the Medien Kultur Haus (former Sparkasse) and the Bahnhofstrasse can be seen below:

Altes Sparkassengebäude Wels

Wels Bahnhofstrasse Österreich