Lyon | France | Rue de la Republique | Week 31

Lyon [italian: Lione; old german: Leyden], founded by the Romans as Lugdunum in 43 BC, but earlier celtic settlements existed. The city lies about 300 km north of Marseille, 350 km west of Milan and about 400 km southeast of Paris. It is the 3rd largest city in France and no. 60 within the european union.

Population: 507.000 [2014] | 415.000 [1990] | 580.000 [1931] | 460.000 [1901]

Lyon is especially known for its history, its unique cityscape, its economical role in France and it is a UNESCO world heritage site. Following its roman foundation it was the Gaul capital for several centuries, before it became the centre of the Burgundian Kingdom. In 1032 it became part of the Holy Roman Empire and it wasn’t before the 14th century, that Lyon finally belonged to France. For centuries the city was the banking centre of France and  the archbishop of Lyon is regarded the highest religious authority in France. Another keystone of the cities importance had been the silk trade, which resulted in the cities numerous silk workshops and a fast growth during industrialisation. Also the Lumière brother invented the cinematographe in Lyon. Today the city is a centre of commerce, of education, the major transportation hub in southern France, the seat of Interpol and the „Capital of Lights“, thanks to its annual light festival Fête des Lumières.

Here we see a part of the Rue de la Republique, the major shopping street in the centre of Lyon, running from the Place Bellecour (right edge) to the Hôtel de Ville (City Hall) further north. This section in the panorama ends at the Place de la Republique (left). The street was originally created in the 1850s with most buildings reflecting the Haussmann style of the era. Notable are the Art Deco style Cinema Pathé (with a golden rooster on top) and the former Le Progrés newspaper headquarters near the right end of the panorama.

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Lyon street shopping Cinema Pathe Le Progres Architecture

For classic view and more infos about the place:

Rue de la Republique France

Find more streetline previews in our Lyon Architecture overview (german link).

Also finalized and published is this view of the Place Neuve Saint-Jean

Lyon Square Vieux Lyon

A preview of the church Saint Nizier with the adjoining Rue de Brest on its right

Saint Nizier Lyon

Quai Fulchiron across the Saône in the Vieux Lyon quarter, with the Fourviere hill in the background

Saône river panorama Lyon

Avignon | France | Palais des Papes | Week 25

Avignon [latin: Avenio], founded in the 6th century BC as Aouenion by greek settlers from Massalia (Marseille). Lies on the left bank of the Rhône river ca. 80 km north of Marseille and 200 km south of Lyon. Avignon is the largest city of the Department Vaucluse, the 5th largest in the Région Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur and Nr. 46 in all of France.

Population: 90.000 [2013] | 87.000 [1990] | 57.000 [1931] | 47.000 [1901]

Avignon has always been situated at the border of different countries, it belonged amongst others to the Greek, the Romans, the Franks, the Kingdom of Provence and Arles, the german Holy Roman Empire, the Papal State and finally to France following the French Revolution. Once in history Avignon became an important political centre – that was after the Pope decided to move its seat from Rome to Avignon in 1309, chosen for its proximity to the papal ruled Comtat Venaissin. For about 70 years the city was the centre of Christianity and served seven popes and two antipopes. Afterwards it still served as a second centre of the pope who sent a papal legate to rule the city. Today the cityscape is still dominated by the gothic 14th century Papal Palace and together with the cathedral and the famous Pont St. Bénézet bridge it earned the city UNESCO world heritage status in 1995.

The short papal rule in Avignon shaped the city more than anything else in its 2.500 years of history, especially with the errection of the Palais des Papes (english: Papal Palace). It was built between 1335 and 1370 by the ruling popes, the main architects were Pierre Poisson (old palace) and Jean de Louvres (new palace). Up until today the palace remains the largest gothic style building in europe. In this panoramic view we see the new palace (Palais-neuf) with the main entrance in the right half, the old palace (Palais-vieux) left of it a little bit to the back and the Avignon Cathedral (Cathédrale Notre-Dame des Doms d’Avignon) left of the Papal Palace. The palace gradually lost its importance and after the french revolution it was used as a military barracks and prison which resulted in the damage of most of its interior and frescos. Since 1906 it is a national conservation project and undergoes restoration ever since.

The Avignon Cathedral was originally built in the 12th century and serves as the seat of the archbishop of Avignon. After restoration in the 19th century a gilded statue of the Virgin Mary was placed atop in 1859.

Find more streetviews and cityscapes from France in our France overview.

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Palais des Papes Architecture Gothic View Street France

For classic view and more infos about the place:

Palais des Papes France Avignon Panorama

Rouen | France | Rue du Gros-Horloge | Week 19

Rouen [latin: Rotomagus], was founded by the tribe of the Veliocasses as Ratumacos, lies about 100 km north-west of Paris and 200 km south of London on the shores of the river Seine. 2nd largest city in the Normandy and 33rd largest city in France.

Population: 111.000 [2013] | 103.000 [1990] | 123.000 [1931] | 116.000 [1901]

The roman Rotomagus was the second most important city of the roman province Gallia after Lugdunum (Lyon). It has been the seat of a bishop since the 4th century. Rouen was captured by the Normans in the 9th century and became the first capital of the Duchy of Normandy in the early 10th century. After the French conquered it again in 1204 it once again belonged to the brittish crown from 1419 to 1449. In late medieval times Rouen was one of the largest european cities with about 40.000 inhabitants. It was here that Joan of Arc was burned at the stake in 1431. Today the city is known for its gothic cathedral and for having the largest number of preserved timber framed buildings in France.

The Rue du Gros-Horloge is a grand example for half-timbered buildings in Rouen. Indeed it is the major street between the cathedral square, we see the Rouen Cathedral at the left edge, and the old marketsquare – the Place de Vieux Marché. The street is named after Rouen’s second landmark, the Gros-Horloge, situated a little further down the right side of the street. It is a fourteenth-century astronomical clock, prominently placed at the side of a tower crossing the street and facing the cathedral.

Find more material from the Normandy in our Normandy overview.

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Rouen France street view framework version

For classic view and more infos about the street:

Rouen France Panorama half timbered framed

We documented several more streets in Rouen, including more stretches of the Rue du Gros-Horloge, for example (unfinnished):

Image Rouen street view block

And a section following the main panorama further down the right ending at the Gros-Horloge (unfinnished):

Rouen Gros-Horloge Normandie

Here is an unfinnished preview of a little side street, Rue Ecuyere:

Rouen Fachwerk Frankreich

Previously published from Rouen: Rue Ganterie

Rouen street view block image

Strasbourg | France | La Petit France | Week 14

Strasbourg [german: Straßburg; dutch: Straatsburg], founded by the Romans as Argentoratum in 12 BCE, lies 100 km west of Stuttgart, 200 km south of Frankfurt and about 450 km east of Paris, largest city of the french region Alsace and 7th largest city in France.

Population: 274.000 (2012) | 252.000 (1990) | 181.000 (1931) | 151.00 (1900)

Strasbourg is the capital of the Alsace (german: Elsass) region, however today it is also one of the capitals of europe, being the seat of the several european institutions like the Council of Europe and the European Parliament as well as the International Institute of Human Rights. Strasbourg’s historic city centre, the Grande Île, has been declared an UNESCO world heritage site in 1988. Historically the city often changed sides between german or french rulers. Since the late 17th century mainly french, german was still the main language till the end of WWII. Strasbourg is an important economic centre and its port is the second largest on the Rhine after Dusiburg, Germany.

La Petit France is a historic quarter in the centre of Strasbourg, part of its UNESCO world heritage site. Here the river Ill forms a number of channels with half timbered houses lining up on the shores and the narrow streets, most of them dating from the 16th and 17th century. La Petit France is now one of Strasbourg’s main tourist attractions.

Visit our archive for other streetline panoramas from France.

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Panorama Strasbourg La Petit France

For classic view (german link):

Strasbourg Petit France

In our archive other streets and squares from Strasbourg are documented. Two unfinnished examples can be seen below.

Grand Rue

Strasbourg Grand Rue Panorama

Rue des Grandes Arcades

Architecture Strasbourg Rue des Grandes Arcades

Deauville | France | Rue du Casino | week 11

Deauville, first mentioned around 1060 as A Enilla, lies on the Normandy coast, west of Trouville, separated by the river Touques, also about 175 km west of Paris.

Population: 3.800 (2012) | 4.300 (1990) | 4.800 (1931)  | 2.900 (1901)

Deauville was just a small farming village up to the 1850s. Then Charles de Morny, half brother of Napoleon III., transformed it into an elegant seaside resort. With its race courses, marinas, villas, harbour, Grand Casino, international Festivals and the close proximity to Paris it became the „Queen of the Norman Beaches“. Deauville is home to several festivals and horse events throughout the year, the most prestigious being the Deauville American Film Festival. Marcel Proust worked on his novel „In search of lost time“ during his summers in Deauville.

With its development into the prime seaside resort in the Normandy, Deauville attracted the wealthy and famous french (including Coco Chanel, André Citroen, Yves Saint Laurent, Josephine Baker, Gustave Flaubert amongst others) and became the Parisian Riviera. Hence one could and can also find the high-class fashion labels in Deauville, with a concentration in the Rue du Casino (Casino Street), right opposite the Casino Barrière de Deauville. The flamboyant style of half timbered houses in Deauville is a product of the neo norman style of the late 19th century.

Visit our archive for other streetline panoramas from the Normandy.

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Architecture Deauville France

For classic view and further details visit the archive:

neonormannischer Stil in Frankreich, Deauville