Basle | Switzerland | Marktplatz | Week 27

Basle [german: Basel; french: Bâle], founded ca. 50 AD by Celts and later named Basilia by the Romans. Lies in the Swiss-German-French tripoint on the shores of the Rhine about 75 km west of Zurich, 300 km west of Munich and 400 km east of Paris. 3rd largest city in Switzerland.

Population: 175.000 [2015] | 178.000 [1990] | 148.000 [1930] | 109.000 [1900]

Basle became a Prince-Bishopric, being ruled by a Bishop, by 999 and in 1501 it joined the Swiss Confederation. The city owns the oldest university (1460) in Switzerland, where Erasmus of Rotterdam and Paracelsus lectured. It was also an early publishing centre of europe. Today Basle is a centre of the chemistry and pharmaceutic industry. The Treaty of Basel ended the Swabian War in 1499. In 1795 the peace of Basel ended the war between France and Prussia/Spain. Also the 1st World Zionist Congress was held in Basel in 1897 and the Basel Convention (1989) lead to a modern international managment of hazardous waste.

In the cityscape above we see the town hall side of the Marktplatz in Basle’s old town. The dominating red building is the city’s town hall, which dates back to 1504 in its oldest parts. Its current shape and facade was designed during a restoration between 1898 and 1904 when the large tower was added as well. An invisible feature of the square is the river Birsig which is covered and runs beneath it towards the Rhine.

Click for larger view:

Basel Basle Marktplatz Architektur Panorama

For classic view and more infos about the place (german link):

Basel Basle Market Square Cityscape

We documented more streets and places in Basle. Find some unfinnished examples below.

Münsterplatz Basel Basle Architecture

Münsterplatz

Basle Freie Strasse streetview

Freie Straße

Pécs | Hungary | University | Week 22

Pécs [german: Fünfkirchen; latin: Quinque Ecclesiae; serbian: Pečuj], known in the 3rd century Roman Empire as Sopianae, then first mentioned as Quinque Basilicae (english: five cathedrals) in 871, lies in a triangle south of Budapest, east of Zagreb and northwest of Belgrade about 150-200 km away from each of these capitals. 5th largest city in Hungary.

Population: 146.000 [2015] | 170.000 [1990] | 74.000 [1930] | 54.000 [1900]

Pécs is one of the oldest cities in Hungary and known for its multicultural flair and history. It is the capital of the Baranya County and the seat of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Pecs. The Early Christian Necropolis of Pecs (Sopianae) has been declared a UNESCO world heritage site in 2000. The city had been a part of Hungary since the late 9th century. It fell under Ottoman Rule in 1543 and was freed again 1686 to become part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. After World War I it became part of the new state Hungary in 1921. Pécs has been a European Capital of Culture in 2010.

The University of Pécs (Pécsi Tudományegyetem) has first been founded in 1367 by Louis I. the Great and was the first university in Hungary. It was however discontinued under Ottoman Rule. The modern university of Pecs was founded in 1912 in Pozsony (now Bratislava) and moved to Pecs in 1921. Above we see the front facade of its main building, housing the Faculty of Business and Economics (KTK).

Click for larger view:

Pécsi Tudományegyetem University Hungary

For classic view and more infos about the streetview (german link):

Pécsi Tudományegyetem Panorama Foto

Another street view we documented is from Széchenyi Square with the Nádor Szálló and Pécs Town Hall (Városháza), previewed here:

Széchenyi Square Streetview Panorama Pecs Hungary

These panoramas of Pécs were created based on photographies taken by the hungarian photographer Kerényi Zoltán.

 

Zwickau | Germany | Hauptmarkt | Week 15

Zwickau, founded in the 12th century, lies 60 km south of Leipzig and about 150 km northwest of Prague at the foot of the ore mountains [german: Erzgebirge], 4th largest city in the german state Saxony and 88th largest city in Germany (2014).

Population: 91.000 (2014) | 122.000 (1988) | 85.000 (1930) | 56.000 (1900)

Zwickau quickly gained importance after its foundation and was a free imperial city in the early 14th century. Besides Wittenberg it was an early centre of the Lutheran Reformation. From the 15th to the 20th century Zwickau was a centre of the mining industry in Germany, especially for hard-coal from Zwickau and silver from the ore mountains. Hence the city played an important role in german industrialisation and was for centuries one of the main economic and cultural centres of Saxony. It is also a cradle of the german automobile industry with Audi and Horch being founded in the city, while during the GDR times it was the city of the Trabant, the most well known car of the eastern bloc.

Here we see a night view in christmas lighting of the southern side of the main market square (Hauptmarkt), which includes two of the cities main buildings, the Gewandhaus on the left and the town hall in the centre. The Gewandhaus (cloth merchants‘ hall) was built in the 16th century and today serves as the main theatre of the city. The town hall was built in 1404 and features the elaborate city emblem above its portal. The last building on this side of the square on the far right, which was unfortunately hidden by christmas stalls for this photography, is the birthplace (and museum) for the famous composer Robert Schuhmann.

Visit our archive for other streetline panoramas from Saxony.

Click for larger view:

Zwickau Gewandhaus Rathaus Hauptmarkt

For classic view (english link):

Zwickau Gewandhaus