Genoa | Italy | Via XX Settembre | Week 26

Genoa [italian: Genova; latin, german: Genua; french: Gênes], oldest references from the 6th century BC as (a probably greek city) Stalia in Liguria but might have been inhabited much earlier. Lies on the mediterranean coast at the centre of the ligurian coastal arch, south of Milan and in the centre of a triangle with Marseille (west, 300 km), Zürich (north, 325 km) and Rome (southeast, 400km). 6th largest city in Italy, 69th largest city in europe.

Population: 587.000 [2015] | 679.000 [1991] | 591.000 [1931] | 378.000 [1901]

Genoa, also called La Superba (the proud one), is especially known for its glorious past. The Romans renamed it Genua and gave it municipal rights. The city had its golden times as the Maritime Republic of Genoa, especially from the 12th to the end of the 14th century. During that time it was one of the leading maritime powers in the Mediterranean with colonies in the Middle East, the Aegean, Sicily and Northern Africa. It controlled Liguria, Piedmont, Sardinia, Corsica and Nice and had trade outposts in many places, especially in Spain and Constantinople. It had another golden time from the 16th century to the French Revolution when the genoese banks collaborated closely with the spanish crown. A famous son of the city was Christopher Columbus, born here in 1451. During the 19th and 20th century Genoa established itself as a ship-building and industrial powerhouse of Italy. Its Palazzi dei Rolli and the Le Strade Nuove (“the new streets”) gave the city an UNESCO world heritage site and in 2004 it was a european capital of culture.

Our streetline presents a section of the  southside of Via XX Settembre in Genoa. This major east-west street from the city centre (at Piazza de Ferrari) towards the East and San Vincenzo developed in the late 19th century. The street is crossed by the bridge Ponte Monumentale in its middle, which we can see at the left edge. It is a major shopping and promenading street of the Genoese and lined by representative buildings from the period, especially some of the finest Art Nouveau buildings in the region.

Click for larger view:

Street view Streetline Streetscape Genoa Genova Italy Italia

For classic view and more infos about the place:

Via XX Settembre Genoa Genova Italy Italia

We documented many more streets and places in Genoa. Find some unfinnished examples below.

Strada Nuova Palazzi dei Rolli Genova Genoa

Via Garibaldi | Strada Nuova

Piazza Caricamento Genoa Genua

Piazza Caricamento

Palazzo San Giorgio Genoa Italy Sights

Palazzo San Giorgio

Canterbury | United Kingdom | St Peter’s Street | Week 23

Canterbury [old german: Kanterburg; welsh: Caergaint], first recorded (BC) as the main settlement of the celtic cantiaci tribe, became a Roman City as Durovernum Cantiacorum in the 1st century AD. Situated 80 km east of London and about 200 km west of Brussels on the shores of the river Stour.

Population: 55.000 [2011] | 43.000 [2001] | 24.000 [1931] | 25.000 [1901]

Canterbury was a capital for the celtic Cantiaci and for the Jute Kingdom of Kent, however its most prominent role has been in church history. Here the oldest church of the english speaking world can be found (St Martin’s Church), St Augustine started his apostle work and the christianisation of England here and the archbishop of Canterbury is the Primate of the Church of England. St Augustine’s Abbey, Canterbury Cathedral and St Martin’s Church form an UNESCO world heritage site. The city is also home to the world’s oldest School, the King’s School. Today the city has one of the strongest economies in the region and is one of the UK’s most visited tourist destinations.

The panorama above shows one of the cities major non-religious landmarks, the Old Weavers House, at the right edge. It was used by the Huguenots and is one of the (still numerous) timber framed 16th and 17th century houses that survived the german Blitz bombings in world war II. St Peter’s street is named after St Peter’s church, which we see a little bit in the back on the left edge. The street connects the High Street at its east end with the Westgate in the west.

To find more published streetline views from the UK visit our United Kingdom archive.

Click for larger view:

Canterbury Cityscape UK Panorama Image

For classic view and more infos about the streetview:

Canterbury Panorama Foto

We have captured some more streetviews in Canterbury a few of which we present here in unfinnished previews:

Canterbury Panorama Buttermarket Cathedral Gate

Cathedral Gate | Buttermarket | Burgate

Canterbury Preview

Great Stour | Westgate Grove

Canterbury High Street

High Street | Royal Museum

Rouen | France | Rue du Gros-Horloge | Week 19

Rouen [latin: Rotomagus], was founded by the tribe of the Veliocasses as Ratumacos, lies about 100 km north-west of Paris and 200 km south of London on the shores of the river Seine. 2nd largest city in the Normandy and 33rd largest city in France.

Population: 111.000 [2013] | 103.000 [1990] | 123.000 [1931] | 116.000 [1901]

The roman Rotomagus was the second most important city of the roman province Gallia after Lugdunum (Lyon). It has been the seat of a bishop since the 4th century. Rouen was captured by the Normans in the 9th century and became the first capital of the Duchy of Normandy in the early 10th century. After the French conquered it again in 1204 it once again belonged to the brittish crown from 1419 to 1449. In late medieval times Rouen was one of the largest european cities with about 40.000 inhabitants. It was here that Joan of Arc was burned at the stake in 1431. Today the city is known for its gothic cathedral and for having the largest number of preserved timber framed buildings in France.

The Rue du Gros-Horloge is a grand example for half-timbered buildings in Rouen. Indeed it is the major street between the cathedral square, we see the Rouen Cathedral at the left edge, and the old marketsquare – the Place de Vieux Marché. The street is named after Rouen’s second landmark, the Gros-Horloge, situated a little further down the right side of the street. It is a fourteenth-century astronomical clock, prominently placed at the side of a tower crossing the street and facing the cathedral.

Find more material from the Normandy in our Normandy overview.

Click for larger view:

Rouen France street view framework version

For classic view and more infos about the street:

Rouen France Panorama half timbered framed

We documented several more streets in Rouen, including more stretches of the Rue du Gros-Horloge, for example (unfinnished):

Image Rouen street view block

And a section following the main panorama further down the right ending at the Gros-Horloge (unfinnished):

Rouen Gros-Horloge Normandie

Here is an unfinnished preview of a little side street, Rue Ecuyere:

Rouen Fachwerk Frankreich

Previously published from Rouen: Rue Ganterie

Rouen street view block image