Lyon | France | Rue de la Republique | Week 31

Lyon [italian: Lione; old german: Leyden], founded by the Romans as Lugdunum in 43 BC, but earlier celtic settlements existed. The city lies about 300 km north of Marseille, 350 km west of Milan and about 400 km southeast of Paris. It is the 3rd largest city in France and no. 60 within the european union.

Population: 507.000 [2014] | 415.000 [1990] | 580.000 [1931] | 460.000 [1901]

Lyon is especially known for its history, its unique cityscape, its economical role in France and it is a UNESCO world heritage site. Following its roman foundation it was the Gaul capital for several centuries, before it became the centre of the Burgundian Kingdom. In 1032 it became part of the Holy Roman Empire and it wasn’t before the 14th century, that Lyon finally belonged to France. For centuries the city was the banking centre of France and  the archbishop of Lyon is regarded the highest religious authority in France. Another keystone of the cities importance had been the silk trade, which resulted in the cities numerous silk workshops and a fast growth during industrialisation. Also the Lumière brother invented the cinematographe in Lyon. Today the city is a centre of commerce, of education, the major transportation hub in southern France, the seat of Interpol and the „Capital of Lights“, thanks to its annual light festival Fête des Lumières.

Here we see a part of the Rue de la Republique, the major shopping street in the centre of Lyon, running from the Place Bellecour (right edge) to the Hôtel de Ville (City Hall) further north. This section in the panorama ends at the Place de la Republique (left). The street was originally created in the 1850s with most buildings reflecting the Haussmann style of the era. Notable are the Art Deco style Cinema Pathé (with a golden rooster on top) and the former Le Progrés newspaper headquarters near the right end of the panorama.

Click for larger view:

Lyon street shopping Cinema Pathe Le Progres Architecture

For classic view and more infos about the place:

Rue de la Republique France

Find more streetline previews in our Lyon Architecture overview (german link).

Also finalized and published is this view of the Place Neuve Saint-Jean

Lyon Square Vieux Lyon

A preview of the church Saint Nizier with the adjoining Rue de Brest on its right

Saint Nizier Lyon

Quai Fulchiron across the Saône in the Vieux Lyon quarter, with the Fourviere hill in the background

Saône river panorama Lyon

Görlitz | Germany | Augustastrasse | Week 30

Görlitz [polish: Zgorzelec], first mention as Goreliz in 1071. It is the easternmost city in germany, lying about 80 km east of Dresden, 120 km west of Wroclaw (Breslau) and 120 km north of Prague. Görlitz is the 6th largest city in the german state Saxony and the largest within the region Upper Lusatia (Oberlausitz).

Population: 55.000 [2015] | 72.000 [1990] | 94.000 (1930) | 81.000 [1900]

Görlitz is especially known for its well preserved old town, it is member of the working group historic cities in germany. From its early times the city belonged to the bohemian kingdom, later it became part of Saxony, then Silesia (in Prussia) and finally Germany (incl. GDR). It was a strong trade city in late medieval times, esp. due to its monopoly for woad trade in Bohemia. Görlitz was a member of the Lusatian League and as such held rights similar to free imperial cities for some time. In 1945 the new border between Germany and Poland cut through the city along the Neisse river. It’s eastern part is now an independent city – Zgorcelec in Poland. Economically the city has a long history in the production of trams and trains. Nowadays the city is also a favourite spot for big movie productions, earning it its nickname Görliwood.

The street front above is a section of Augustastrasse, a street full of examples of historicism style, which is common in the areas around the old town centre. Görlitz is also known as a so called Pensionopolis, an attractive city with relatively low rents that attracts the elder and retired people. While the city experienced an economic decline since 1990 it still managed to restore the majority of its historic buildings – in large parts thanks to the anonymous Altstadtmillion (old town million). Between 1995 and 2016 each year the city received an anonymous amount of one million Deutsche Mark (later that amount in Euro) to be spent for reconstructing the old town. The results can be seen all over Görlitz.

Click for larger view:

Architektur Görlitz Sachsen Lausitz Schlesien

For classic view and more infos about the place (german here):

Görlitz Architecture Panorama

We documented more streets and places in Görlitz. Find some previews below. For more views from saxon cities follow the link to our Saxony archive.

A panorama of the central block on the lower market square (Untermarkt).

Untermarkt Görlitz Panorama Foto

The Brüderstrasse between Obermarkt and Untermarkt with the Silesian Museum (left).

streetview Görlitz Brüderstrasse old town streetline

A section of the Obermarkt (Upper Market) from 2011.

Oberlausitz Görlitz Architektur Fassaden

The main station.

Görlitz Bahnhof train station

Genoa | Italy | Via XX Settembre | Week 26

Genoa [italian: Genova; latin, german: Genua; french: Gênes], oldest references from the 6th century BC as (a probably greek city) Stalia in Liguria but might have been inhabited much earlier. Lies on the mediterranean coast at the centre of the ligurian coastal arch, south of Milan and in the centre of a triangle with Marseille (west, 300 km), Zürich (north, 325 km) and Rome (southeast, 400km). 6th largest city in Italy, 69th largest city in europe.

Population: 587.000 [2015] | 679.000 [1991] | 591.000 [1931] | 378.000 [1901]

Genoa, also called La Superba (the proud one), is especially known for its glorious past. The Romans renamed it Genua and gave it municipal rights. The city had its golden times as the Maritime Republic of Genoa, especially from the 12th to the end of the 14th century. During that time it was one of the leading maritime powers in the Mediterranean with colonies in the Middle East, the Aegean, Sicily and Northern Africa. It controlled Liguria, Piedmont, Sardinia, Corsica and Nice and had trade outposts in many places, especially in Spain and Constantinople. It had another golden time from the 16th century to the French Revolution when the genoese banks collaborated closely with the spanish crown. A famous son of the city was Christopher Columbus, born here in 1451. During the 19th and 20th century Genoa established itself as a ship-building and industrial powerhouse of Italy. Its Palazzi dei Rolli and the Le Strade Nuove („the new streets“) gave the city an UNESCO world heritage site and in 2004 it was a european capital of culture.

Our streetline presents a section of the  southside of Via XX Settembre in Genoa. This major east-west street from the city centre (at Piazza de Ferrari) towards the East and San Vincenzo developed in the late 19th century. The street is crossed by the bridge Ponte Monumentale in its middle, which we can see at the left edge. It is a major shopping and promenading street of the Genoese and lined by representative buildings from the period, especially some of the finest Art Nouveau buildings in the region.

Click for larger view:

Street view Streetline Streetscape Genoa Genova Italy Italia

For classic view and more infos about the place:

Via XX Settembre Genoa Genova Italy Italia

We documented many more streets and places in Genoa. Find some unfinnished examples below.

Strada Nuova Palazzi dei Rolli Genova Genoa

Via Garibaldi | Strada Nuova

Piazza Caricamento Genoa Genua

Piazza Caricamento

Palazzo San Giorgio Genoa Italy Sights

Palazzo San Giorgio

Greiz | Germany | Train Station | Week 21

Greiz, first mentioned as Grewcs in 1209, lies 80 km south of Leipzig, 120 km west of Dresden and ca. 250 km east of Frankfurt on the river Weisse Elster. 18th largest city of the german state Thuringia (german: Thüringen).

Population: 21.000 [2014] | 36.000 [1984] | 39.000 [1931] | 23.000 [1905]

Greiz, also nicknamed the „Pearl of the Vogtland“ is situated in the thuringian Vogtland, named after the Vögte (advocats) of Weida, Gera, Plauen and Greiz. First a residence in the mid 13th century it has been home to the „House of Reuss“, a ruling german dynasty, from the 14th century to 1918. They have built the two castles in the city, the Oberes Schloss (Upper Castle) and Unteres Schloss (Lower Castle). As a former residence city Greiz is known for its representative buildings, some of them in Art Nouveau style, and the english style Greizer Park with its Sommerpalais (summer palace).

Here we see the main train station building of Greiz with its annexe buildings. The station building was errected in the 1870s when the connection to Plauen was established. At the time of this photograph in 2014 it was uninhabited and as a sign on its door declares „for sale“ – though trains are still stopping at the station. However we chose this street view as an example of train stations in linear panorama views. The historic station buildings all over europe often occupied a complete street front hard to be photographed in its entirety. You can find more examples in our train station archive.

Click for larger view:

Bahnhof Greiz Thueringen Panorama

For classic view and more infos about the streetview (german link):

train station germany greiz

Previously published streetlines from Thuringia and Greiz

Yet unpublished here is a linear view of the central ensemble with the Lower Castle, the Gymnasium and the Upper Castle in the back:

Greiz Panorama Unteres Oberes Schloss

We documented a number of train station buildings across europe (inlcuding Istanbul, Prague, Paris, Milan, Glasgow…) which are yet unedited, here are some unfinnished examples:

Görlitz Bahnhof train station

Quedlinburg train station germany

Bahnhof Rheinland Pfalz Worms

Öuxor train station test photography

Prague train station

top to bottom: Görlitz, Quedlinburg, Worms, Luxor, Prague

 

Edinburgh | United Kingdom | Victoria Street | Week 20

Edinburgh [scottish gaelic: Dùn Èideann; french: Édimbourg], the hill forth Din Eidyn by the Gododdin tribe was built sometime before 600 AD and the city was founded as a royal burgh in the early 12th century. Situated about 70 km east of Glasgow and ca. 550 km north of London on the southern shore of the Firth of Forth. 2nd largest city in Scotland, 8th largest city in the United Kingdom and 61st largest city in the european union.

Population: 493.000 [2014] | 419.000 [1991] | 439.000 [1991] | 395.000 [1901]

Edinburgh, lying east of Glasgow in the scottish central belt, has been the capital of Scotland since the mid 15th century, hence it is the seat of the Scottish Parliament and of the monarchy in Scotland. The city is a UNESCO world heritage site since 1995, notably for its Old Town with Edinburgh Castle, the Holyrood Palace and the Royal Mile connecting the two, as well as the planned 18th century Georgian New Town. The city is also home to the National Museum and the National Library of Scotland as well as the Scottish National Gallery. Today the city is known for its strong economic, especially in the financial sector and the tourism industry, as well as its cultural festivals, especially the Edinburgh International Festival and the Fringe Festival.

Victoria Street is the historical, being called West Bow then, entrance to the Castle Hill from western direction. It was transformed to its current shape in the early 19th century and renamed Victoria Street when Queen Victoria was crowned. Most buildings were errected in the mid 19th century, though some older buildings remained at the foot of the street. Here we see the grand India Buildings from 1864 on the left and the former St. John’s Church from 1838 in the middle.

For more Edinburgh street views visit our Edinburgh Architecture blog post.

Click for larger view:

Edinburgh Panorama street view photography

For classic view and more infos about the street:

Edinburgh Streetview Photography Scotland

We documented several more streetline views in the Old Town and New Town of Edinburgh (see Edinburgh blog post) including the complete Royal Mile. This section of the Royal Mile (Lawnmarket) has been published before:

Scotland Royal Mile Photography

And a preview of the Royal Mile along the High Street:

Edinburgh Royal Mile Panorama

Another unfinnished preview of the Jenners department store in the New Town:

Edinburgh Jenners Preview